Day By Day© by Chris Muir.

Tuesday, June 07, 2005

One of the wonderful aspects...

of life in the 'BLOGOSPHERE' is the exposure to ideas. Raw ideas can be a dangerous thing. Hey, look at the problems Thomas Paine created with the Federalist Papers. How revolting! :) :) ;)
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And voting (vox populi...), now there's a real problem. And the French Government sprang to the conclusion that the pointy heads knew what the folks on the farms wanted! Please say loudly one more time what happened when the people voted (up or down) on the EU constitution.
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What happens in the 'Blogosphere' is that we become immersed in the 'commonality of mankind'. One's 'band of brothers' increases in size when ones hears from the 'brothers' without editing from the big media outlets - without other people deciding what is important for me to read.
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So let's look at other unreported sentiments. How about this from Latvia...
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If Lithuania was the Delaware of the European Union, Latvia was ready to lick Brussels boots no matter what the consequences or circumstances, as it was expected.
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After a resounding Non in France and even a more resounding Nee in the Netherlands, Latvian MPs gave a wholehearted Jā to Brussels just a day after the referendum in Holland.
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Simply outstanding. One wonders if they would sign up to the toilet paper if it came from Brussels.
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The French and Dutch rejection of the Constitution Treaty sparked some debate over the future of Europe and the place of its citizens in EU. As Nosemonkey writes,
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"Of course, the irony of the current situation is that in seeing the constitution rejected, the EU is experiencing its first proper period of internal debate in which the people are actively involved – via letters pages, chats in the pub etc. – in its history. It could well be that this "crisis" (it is actually nothing of the sort, except for the elites who tried to impose this constitution on us) could be the best thing for the EU, simply for its ability to get the people talking about it for a change."
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"People talking" - there is a concept that really needs repression!
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From the LONDON TIMES...
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The question of whether or how to keep the constitution alive will now go to the EU summit next week, but senior British officials were predicting that the heads of government would fudge the outcome. "There will be the leaders of ten countries who have approved the constitution sitting down with the leaders of two whose countries have rejected it and others who want it to be abandoned. That does not point to a straightforward outcome," one said.
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Ministers believe that France and Germany are making an issue of Britain’s rebate partly to distract attention from the crisis over the constitution.
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Mr Straw told the Commons that talks on accession of new members — Bulgaria, Romania and Turkey — would continue. Public opinion in France and Germany has swung heavily against admitting a huge, predominantly Muslim country whose cheap labour could undercut their own. Paris and Berlin also see enlargement as a British plot to dilute their influence in Brussels.
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Opposition to the constitution is highest and has increased most among Conservative voters, at 71 per cent, up 30 points since April 23. Opposition is lowest among Labour voters, at 40 per cent, compared with 25 per cent of them saying that they will vote.
. . . . .
The question of whether or how to keep the constitution alive will now go to the EU summit next week, but senior British officials were predicting that the heads of government would fudge the outcome. "There will be the leaders of ten countries who have approved the constitution sitting down with the leaders of two whose countries have rejected it and others who want it to be abandoned. That does not point to a straightforward outcome," one said.
. . . . .
Ministers believe that France and Germany are making an issue of Britain’s rebate partly to distract attention from the crisis over the constitution.
. . . . .
Mr Straw told the Commons that talks on accession of new members — Bulgaria, Romania and Turkey — would continue. Public opinion in France and Germany has swung heavily against admitting a huge, predominantly Muslim country whose cheap labour could undercut their own. Paris and Berlin also see enlargement as a British plot to dilute their influence in Brussels.
. . . . .
Opposition to the constitution is highest and has increased most among Conservative voters, at 71 per cent, up 30 points since April 23. Opposition is lowest among Labour voters, at 40 per cent, compared with 25 per cent of them saying that they will vote.
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The Giggle that you hear in the BLOGOSPERE carries over into the Green Frog's BOGOSPERE.
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Chortling in the swamp,
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Kermit

5 Comments:

At Tue Jun 07, 04:12:00 AM, Anonymous Aleks said...

Re: So let's look at other unreported sentiments. How about this from Lithuania...

First, thanks for the link.

Second, It's from Latvia, not Lithuania. Lithuania was the first country to ratify EU Constitution - that's why I called the Delaware of EU.

Third, Latvia's ratification was noted by Western media. Sure, it didn't make the front-page news, but it it didn't go unnoticed. So the stuff is out there, blogosphere or otherwise. You just have to know where to look.

 
At Tue Jun 07, 04:27:00 AM, Blogger Kermit said...

aleks...

The adjustment is noted and correction is made. The Bog Frog is turning quite brown. That is caused by frogs being naturally green and then attempting to blush in red.

Apologetic here in the swamp

Kermit

 
At Tue Jun 07, 04:40:00 AM, Anonymous Aleks said...

Oh that's quite all right.

 
At Thu Jun 09, 11:14:00 AM, Blogger jcadla said...

You know, I sort of wonder what will happen with this "European Union" the first time a situation arises that challenges the sovereignty of one of the member nations. This was started as a means of uniting Europe to be a world power in the financial arena; primarily to challenge the US.

Maybe like what happened when it was suggested US soldiers wear the UN blues during the Kosovo conflict. 'oops'...not a good idea...

 
At Thu Jun 09, 03:02:00 PM, Blogger Kermit said...

I think that's about the size of it, jcadla.

There seems to be precious little uniting it other than the 'good will' of the pointy headed governmental types.

The working stiffs seem to want a bit more say in the spending of their money. And also they seem to have some serious questions about maintaining national identities. E.G. - on the factory floor or the threshing machine, there seems to be a bit of conservatism rearing its head.

Gee... That almost sounds like the USA us.

Giggling in the Bog,

Kermit

 

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